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French Camp, CA 95231

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Child abuse

Child abuse

Maltreatment

An action or lack of action by a parent, caretaker, or other person, as defined under state law, having caused physical abuse, medical neglect, sexual abuse, or emotional abuse harm, or risk of harm to a child.

Medical neglect

The harm by a caretaker to a child’s health due to failure to provide for appropriate health care of the child, although financially able to do so, or offered financial or other means to do so. May include prenatal exposure to drugs.

Physical Abuse

A type of maltreatment referring to physical acts that caused or could have caused physical injury to the child.

Physical or emotional abuse

A type of maltreatment that refers to acts or omissions of acts other than physical abuse or sexual abuse, that causes, or could have caused, conduct, cognitive, affective, or other mental disorders, such as emotional neglect, psychological abuse, mental injury, etc.

Sexual abuse

A type of maltreatment that refers to the involvement of a child in sexual activity to provide sexual gratification or financial benefit to the perpetrator, including contacts for sexual purposes, prostitution, pornography, exposure, or other sexually exploitative activities.

maltreatment

An action or lack of action by a parent, caretaker, or other person, as defined under state law, having caused physical abuse, medical neglect, sexual abuse, or emotional abuse harm, or risk of harm to a child.

Medical Neglect

The harm by a caretaker to a child’s health due to failure to provide for appropriate health care of the child, although financially able to do so, or offered financial or other means to do so. May include prenatal exposure to drugs.

Physical Abuse

A type of maltreatment referring to physical acts that caused or could have caused physical injury to the child.

Physical or Emotional Abuse

A type of maltreatment that refers to acts or omissions of acts other than physical abuse or sexual abuse, that causes, or could have caused, conduct, cognitive, affective, or other mental disorders, such as emotional neglect, psychological abuse, mental injury, etc. 

Sexual Abuse

A type of maltreatment that refers to the involvement of a child in sexual activity to provide sexual gratification or financial benefit to the perpetrator, including contacts for sexual purposes, prostitution, pornography, exposure, or other sexually exploitative activities.

Physical Signs/Indicators

  • Bruises and/or welts which may have a definite shape or pattern
  • Burns
  • Fractures or abrasions
  • Other injuries that may be caused by biting, cutting, punching, twisting limbs, or whipping
  • Head injuries
  • Rope burns (scars) on wrists and/or ankles
  • Internal injuries
  • Multiple injuries at various stages of healing

Child Behavior Indicators

  • Exaggerated fearfulness
  • Frightened of parents or other adults
  • Wary or physical contact
  • Afraid to go home
  • Attempts to hide injuries
  • Over vigilant, apprehensive
  • Overly aggressive
  • Destructive towards self/others
  • Acting out behavior 
  • Overly Passive
  • Withdrawn, overly compliant, apathetic, anxious, depressed
  • Overly protective of parent or caretaker
  • Inappropriate maturity
  • Drastic behavior changes
  • Arrive at school early, leave late 
  • Isolation from social relationships
  • Poor peer relationships
  • Sleep disorders
  • Running away

Parent or Caretaker Behavior Indicators

  • Concealment of child’s injuries
  • Delay in seeking medical attention or minimizing the severity of the injury
  • History of injury not compatible with the severity of ijury
  • Attempts to control the child’s communication
  • Irrational thought process, unrealistic expectation of the child

This type of abuse refers to acts or omissions of acts other than physical or sexual abuse, that cause, or could have caused, conduct, cognitive, affective, or other mental disorder such as emotional neglect, psychological neglect, psychological abuse, mental injury, etc. 

Physical Signs/Indicators

  • Substance abuse
  • Lack of supervision, control, communication
  • Poor growth pattern/failure to thrive
  • Hunger, malnutrition
  • Poor hygiene
  • Lack of appropriate/necessary clothing
  • Unattended physical/medical problems
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Unsafe/unsanitary living conditions
  • Absence of adequate/appropriate food

Child Behavior Indicators

  • Unsafe/unsanitary living conditions
  • Absence of adequate/appropriate food
  • Child relating accounts of neglectful behavior by a caretaker
  • Delayed development, speech, body size, coordination
  • Ingestion of harmful substances
  • Repeated accidents
  • Inappropriate dress for weather conditions
  • Extremes in behavior
  • Socially withdrawn, apathetic
  • Noticeably anti-social, destructive behavior
  • Begs, hoards, steals food
  • Chronic absence/tardiness at school
  • Children caring for children
  • Parental role reversal

Parent/Caretaker Behavior Indicators

  • Apathetic/Passive
  • Unresponsive attitude
  • Depression
  • Socially/Physically isolated
  • Substance aubser
  • Dispalys irrational/Bizarre behavior
  • Leaves children unattended/unsupervised 

The harm by a caretaker to a child’s health due to failure to provide for appropriate health care of the child, although financially able to do so. This type of neglect pertains to a diagnosed medical condition. Should these conditions remain untreated, it would be detrimental to the child. 

Physical Signs/Indicators

  • The child has a diagnosed medical condition that is not being treated
  • The child has an “obvious” medical condition that is not being treated

There is legislation that mandates the reporting of child abuse. Any child care custodian, health practitioner, employee of child protective agency, child visitation monitor, firefighter, animal control officer, or human society officer who has knowledge of or observes a child, in their professional capacity or within the scope of their employment, whom they reasonably suspect has been the victim of child abuse. They must report immediately or as soon as reasonably possible by telephone. They must prepare and send a written report within 36 hours of receiving information of the incident (Penal Code Sec. 11166). 

in the case where observed physical or sexual abuse of a child is occurring, contact the local law enforcement agency immediately. If necessary, use the 911 system. 

If you have information that leads you to believe that physical or sexual abuse is occurring, contact the local law enforcement agency or child protective services. 

If you have any doubt about who may be responsible for investigating the abuse, report to any agency mentioned. There is cross reporting between agencies. The appropriate agency to investigate will be determined and contacted. 

Contact Agencies

San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office
(209) 468-4400 (24 hours)
7000 Michael Canlis Blvd.
French Camp, California 95231

Child Protective Services
(209) 468-1333
102 S. San Joaquin St. 
Stockton, California 95201

Elder abuse

Elder Abuse

Elder

Any person residing in this state, 65 years of age or older.

Dependent adult

Any person residing in this state, between the ages of 18 and 64, who has physical or mental limitations that restrict his or her ability to carry out normal activities or to protect his or her rights including, but not limited to, persons who have physical or developmental disabilities or whose physical or mental abilities have diminished because of age.

CAre custodian

Any administrator or an employee of any of the following public or private facilities or agencies, or persons providing care or services for elders or dependent adults, except persons who do not work directly with elders or dependant adults as part of their official duties, including members of support staff and maintenance staff.

Types of abuse

Physical, Psychological, Financial, Neglect

Elder

Any person residing in this state, 65 years of age or older.

dependent adult

Any person residing in this state, between the ages of 18 and 64, who has physical or mental limitations that restrict his or her ability to carry out normal activities or to protect his or her rights including, but not limited to, persons who have physical or developmental disabilities or whose physical or mental abilities have diminished because of age.

Care Custodian

Any administrator or an employee of any of the following public or private facilities or agencies, or persons providing care or services for elders or dependent adults, except persons who do not work directly with elders or dependant adults as part of their official duties, including members of support staff and maintenance staff

Types of abuse

Physical, Psychological, Financial, Neglect

Physical abuse is the infliction of physical harm or injury upon an elder by a person who stands in a position of trust or who has care or custody of the older person.

Includes But Is Not Limited To

  • Physical harm
  • Sexual assault
  • Unreasonable physical constraint
  • Inappropriate use of physical or chemical restraint, or psychotropic medication

Physical Signs and Indicators

  • Uncombed hair or unshaven
  • Patches of hair missing and/or bleeding below the scalp
  • Poor skin condition or poor skin hygiene
  • Unkempt or dirty
  • Malnourished or dehydrated
  • An untreated medical condition
  • Soiled clothing or bedding
  • Torn, stained, or bloody underclothing
  • Foul smell
  • Unexplained cuts, pinch marks, lacerations, or puncture wounds
  • Unexplained bruises or welts
  • Bruises or welts in various stages of healing
  • Burns
  • Injuries that are incompatible with explanations
  • Home and yard in obvious need of repair

Psychological or emotional abuse is the infliction of mental anguish by using language which is demeaning, cruel, insulting, or causes concern for one’s safety.

Includes But Is Not Limited To

  • Verbal assaults, threats, or harassment
  • Subjecting a person to fear of isolation or serious emotional distress
  • Withholding emotional support
  • Confinement

Behavior Indicators

  • Confused
  • Frightened
  • Extremely forgetful
  • Withdrawn
  • Depressed
  • Helpless
  • Angry
  • Disoriented about time and place
  • Telling implausible stories
  • Hesitant to talk freely

 

Financial abuse can be perpetrated by trusted family members and friends as well as strangers.

Includes But Not Limited To

  • Theft
  • Embezzlement
  • Misuse of funds or property
  • Extortion
  • Fraud
  • Scams

Financial Indicators

  • Unusual activity in bank accounts, such as withdrawal from automatic teller machines when the person cannot walk or get to the bank.
  • Signatures on checks or other documents that do not match the person’s signature
  • Signatures on checks or other documents when the elder cannot write
  • Lack of or missing amenities – T.V., personal grooming times, appropriate clothing
  • Patterns of spending change – the elderly person buys things and they have no need or use for
  • Unpaid bills when someone has been designated to pay the bills
  • The elder has been placed in a care facility not consistent with their income. A senior with a $2,000 a month income, being placed in. a$250 a month facility
  • The elder is denied necessary placement adn/or services by. theperson controlling the elders resources

There is legislation that mandates the reporting of child abuse. Any child care custodian, health practitioner, employee of child protective agency, child visitation monitor, firefighter, animal control officer, or human society officer who has knowledge of or observes a child, in their professional capacity or within the scope of their employment, whom they reasonably suspect has been the victim of child abuse. They must report immediately or as soon as reasonably possible by telephone. They must prepare and send a written report within 36 hours of receiving information of the incident (Penal Code Sec. 11166). 

in the case where observed physical or sexual abuse of a child is occurring, contact the local law enforcement agency immediately. If necessary, use the 911 system. 

If you have information that leads you to believe that physical or sexual abuse is occurring, contact the local law enforcement agency or child protective services. 

If you have any doubt about who may be responsible for investigating the abuse, report to any agency mentioned. There is cross reporting between agencies. The appropriate agency to investigate will be determined and contacted. 

Contact Agencies

San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office
(209) 468-4400 (24 hours)
7000 Michael Canlis Blvd.
French Camp, California 95231

Child Protective Services
(209) 468-1333
102 S. San Joaquin St. 
Stockton, California 95201

Sexual assault

Sexual assault

What is sexual assault?

The California Penal Code describes specific acts that are illegal. These acts are rape (261 PC), statutory rape (261.5 PC), rape in concert (264.1 PC), sodomy (286 PC), oral copulation (288a PC), and penetration of a genital or anal opening by a foreign object (289 PC).

Reporting a sexual assault

The victim of a sexual assault or drugging needs to get to the hospital as soon as possible. Medical staff at the hospital will notify the appropriate law enforcement agency. If a victim is incapacitated, or cannot be transported for any reason, call 911.

Women’s Center Help Lines:
Domestic Violence: (209) 465-4878
Sexual Assault: (209) 465-4997

What is sexual assault?

What is sexual assault?

The California Penal Code describes specific acts that are illegal. These acts are rape (261 PC), statutory rape (261.5 PC), rape in concert (264.1 PC), sodomy (286 PC), oral copulation (288a PC), and penetration of a genital or anal opening by a foreign object (289 PC).

Reporting a sexual assault

Reporting a sexual assualt

The victim of a sexual assault or drugging needs to get to the hospital as soon as possible. Medical staff at the hospital will notify the appropriate law enforcement agency. If a victim is incapacitated, or cannot be transported for any reason, call 911.

Women’s Center Help Lines:
Domestic Violence: (209) 465-4878
Sexual Assault: (209) 465-4997

Being the victim of a sexual assault is a life-changing and traumatic experience. The victim of a sexual assault is also the key to a law enforcement agency’s ability to solving the crime. The person who perpetrates a sexual assault either has done it before or will likely do it again. These perpetrators need to be stopped.

Locard’s Exchange principle states it is not possible to come into contact with an object or an environment without changing it, whether by adding to it or by taking away from it. The more contact between the victim and the perpetrator, the greater chance of exchange.

In the last decade, there have been advances in science and technology, that have increased the likelihood of prosecution of these perpetrators. Deoxyribonucleic Acid, DNA, testing is one of these sciences. Law enforcement agencies can obtain DNA identification from numerous sources from the body. Some of these sources are semen, saliva, blood, tissue, and hair. Some or all of these sources are potentially obtainable as a result of a sexual assault.

The victim of a sexual assault needs to get to a hospital as soon as possible. A victim may also call their local law enforcement agency, who will come to where they are. It is understandable that the victim of a sexual assault would want to get out of the clothes worn when assaulted. It is also understandable that the victim would want to cleanse themselves. It is important that the victim of the sexual assault does none of these things. They have evidence that can be lost as a result, may reduce the possibility of prosecuting the perpetrator.

Law enforcement agencies and medical personnel realize how traumatic a sexual assault is. The victim of a sexual assault has the right to have a support person with them. This support person may be a friend or family member. The support person may stay with the sexual assault victim throughout the medical examination and interview, as long as they do not interfere.

If a sexual assault victim does not have anyone for support and request someone, the woman Center will provide a support person. The women’s center will be contacted by the medical personnel at the hospital.

A report will be compiled with all of the information in reference to a sexual assault. A sexual assault victim may choose to keep her or his personal information confidential. The victim of the sexual assault may be referred to through the court proceedings as Jane Doe or John Doe if it does not unduly prejudiced the prosecution or the defense. (Penal Code section 293, 293.5, and 841.5 Gov. Code 6254).

The term “Date Rape Drug” has been introduced in recent years. These drugs are used to facilitate sexual assaults. These drugs are gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Rohypnol. GHB is a powerful synthetic drug that acts as a depressant on the central nervous system. GHB is most commonly made in a clear liquid form. This form is colorless and odorless. It has also been producing a white crystal like powder. GHB may be recognizable by its slightly “salty” taste.

The effects of the drug can be felt within 15 minutes after ingestion. GHB can cause dizziness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, seizures, respiratory depression, intense drowsiness, unconsciousness, and coma. GHB can cause memory loss for events following ingestion.

When GHB is ingested with alcohol or other drugs, the effects may be life-threatening. Without immediate medical care, the results may even be fatal.

Rohypnol is the brand name for flunitrazepam, a benzodiazepine drug. Rohypnol is a potent fast-acting sedative. It is most commonly found in tablet form. It is occasionally found in liquid form.

Rohypnol’s effects may be noticeable within twenty to thirty minutes after ingestion. Rohypnol can cause drowsiness, confusion, impaired motor skills, dizziness, disinhibition, impaired judgment, and reduce levels of consciousness. Rohypnol can cause partial or complete memory loss of incidents that occur after ingestion. This “amnestic” effect is especially likely when ingested with alcohol.

Results from a national testing program show that alcohol is the most frequently found substance in urine submitted by sexual assault victims. As indicated, alcohol intensifies the effect of both of these drugs.

Be cautious and protect yourself. Do not leave any beverage unattended and discard any beverage that has an unusual taste or appearance (e.g. salty taste, excessive foam, unexplained residue). 

There are incidents of sexual assault where the perpetrator is unknown to the victim. However, statistics show a high percentage of sexual assaults are perpetrated by acquaintances of the victims. Using caution and being aware of your surroundings will lessen your chances of being a victim.

There are simple precautions that can be exercised. What out during hours of Darkness, Park your vehicles, and well-lighted areas. Look inside the vehicle before opening the doors. When you must Park in poorly lighted or remote areas, have someone accompany you to your vehicle.

If you are in a group or at a party, designate someone to remain sober for the gathering. This person can ensure that drinks do not get tampered with and everyone gets home safe. Simple precautions like these can prevent problems from occurring. They also help ensure there are fond memories to look back on, rather than friends becoming victims.

Resources

Resources

The San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office will accept a report, including a telephone report, of a missing or runaway juvenile. There is no minimum amount of time that must pass before the report will be accepted. As soon as a situation is “out of the ordinary”, The report should be made. The more time that passes between the onset of the occurrence and the report, could extend the time it takes to locate the juvenile.

The San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office considered a juvenile to be any person from birth and not 18 years of age. A juvenile is considered at-risk when the evidence or indications exists that: they are a victim of a crime or foul play; they are in need of medical attention; they have no pattern of running away or disappearing; they are the victim of parental abduction or kidnapping; they are mentally impaired.

The San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office will need information from the reporting party About the missing juvenile. This information will consist of habits, friends, and places that are frequented. We will also need an accurate description of the missing juvenile, including and clothing description. Whenever possible a recent photograph of the juvenile is helpful.

It would be beneficial for parents and responsible adults of juveniles to keep this information available should it ever be needed. Also when out of town traveling, a recent photograph of juveniles should be carried.

Often when law enforcement agencies are called for missing small children, they are located in the residence. Small children will crawl into quiet, dark locations and fall asleep (i.e. closets, under or behind beds, etc). You should still immediately contact your local law enforcement agency as soon as the child has noticed missing. This cuts down on the response time should the child not be located. However, you may want to look in these types of locations awaiting our arrival.

Megan Kanka was a 7-year-old girl living in New Jersey. Her abduction, sexual assault, and death prompted this legislation. Since October of 1996, Megan’s Law has allowed law enforcement agencies in California to notify residents of predatory sexual offenders who live in their communities. All sex offenders are required to register with the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction over their place of residence (Penal code section 290 and 290.4 public posting of sex registrant information). When the San Joaquin County Sheriff’s Office has information that we reasonably suspect a sex offender is likely to encounter an entity or individual on a regular basis, they may publicly disclose sex offender information. This disclosure of sex offender information will be to protect the public. When the sex registration unit determines that it is necessary to the public protection to proactively disseminate information, a flyer will be prepared listing the types of information that is legally permissible to be provided. The distribution of the flyer will include the sex offender’s residence address. The flyer may also be distributed at the sex offender’s place of employment and areas frequented by the sex offender that prompted the concern.

Please click here to access San Joaquin County’s Registered Sex Offenders.

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